•  
    Customer Service Helpline
    877-899-8380
  • Speak to representative
    1.800.822.GOLD
Gold 00.00 1.20 0.00%
SILVER 00.00 1.20 0.00%

Coin Symbology

$2 1/2 INDIAN HEAD QUARTER EAGLE

Minted From: 1908-1915 & 1925-1929 Diameter: 18 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia and Denver Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: Bela Lyon Pratt Net Weight: .12094 oz pure gold
Weight: 4.18 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. Inscribed around the top rim of the obverse is the word "LIBERTY".
  2. 2. The obverse features the first realistic depiction of a Native American Chief in war bonnet ever used on a U.S. gold coin. Like the other devices on the coin, the Indian figure is incuse, meaning sunken rather than raised.
  3. 3. The obverse features THIRTEEN STARS representing the original colonies, which are divided by the "LIBERTY" device at the top rim.
  4. 4. The initials BLP of designer Bela Lyon Pratt.
  5. 5. The mint year date runs along the obverse's center bottom rim.
  6. 6. "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" is inscribed around the top rim of the coin's reverse denoting the coin as U.S. legal tender.
  7. 7. The motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" is inscribed near the right rim of the reverse just to the right of the eagle's back.
  8. 8. The central device on the reverse is a majestic eagle, which has traditionally been symbolic for the freedom represented by America.
  9. 9. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "out of many, one," is inscribed on the reverse just to the left of the eagle's breast.
  10. 10. The mint mark location is just to the left of the arrow tips. On the pictured coin, there is no mint mark, which indicates this coin was minted at Philadelphia.
  11. 11. The eagle sits atop a bundle of arrows around which is wrapped in an olive branch. Together, these two symbolize America's military strength and readiness to defend its interests and its desire for peace.
  12. 12. The legal tender denomination of "2 1/2 DOLLARS" is inscribed along the bottom rim of the coin's reverse.

FACT:

On April 2, 1792, a bill passed the U.S. Congress that established that the unit for the $2.50 legal tender coin denomination be described as a "quarter eagle."

$3 INDIAN PRINCESS

Minted From: 1854-1889 Diameter: 20.5 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, Dahlonega, New Orleans & San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: James Longacre Net Weight: .14512 oz pure gold
Weight: 5.015 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" inscribed around the top rim of the obverse denoting the coin as U.S. legal tender.
  2. 2. The head of the Indian Princess is crowned with a circle of feathers held together by a band, which carries the inscription LIBERTY.
  3. 3. Longacre's design depicts Lady Liberty as an Indian Princess with tightly curled neck length hair.
  4. 4. The legal tender denomination of "3 DOLLARS" is inscribed just above dead center of the coin's reverse.
  5. 5. The mint year date is inscribed dead center on the coin's reverse.
  6. 6. Surrounding the dollar denomination and mint year on the coin's reverse is a wreath of tobacco, wheat, corn and cotton, which represents the major agricultural crops of the era.
  7. 7. The mint mark location is just beneath the bottom of the wreath. On the pictured coin, there is no mint mark, which indicates this coin was minted at Philadelphia.

FACT:

The Mint Act of February 21, 1853 authorized the creation of the $3 Indian Princess gold coin, originally conceived to encourage the purchase of three-cent postage stamps in sheets of 100. The idea never caught on and the $3 Indian went on to become one of the lowest mintage series of all U.S. gold coins.

$5 INDIAN HEAD HALF EAGLE

Minted From: 1908-1916 & 1929 Diameter: 21.6 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, New Orleans, Denver & San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: Bela Lyon Pratt Net Weight: .24187 oz pure gold
Weight: 8.359 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. Inscribed around the top rim of the obverse is the word LIBERTY.
  2. 2. The obverse features the first realistic depiction of a Native American Chief in war bonnet ever used on a U.S. gold coin. Like the other devices on the coin, the Indian figure is incuse, meaning sunken rather than raised.
  3. 3. The obverse features THIRTEEN STARS representing the original colonies, which are divided by the LIBERTY device at the top rim.
  4. 4. Designer, Bela Lyon Pratt's initials, BLP.
  5. 5. The mint year date runs along the obverse's center bottom rim.
  6. 6. "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" is inscribed around the top rim of the coin's reverse denoting the coin as US legal tender.
  7. 7. The motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" is inscribed near the right rim of the reverse just to the right of the eagle's back.
  8. 8. The central device on the reverse is a majestic eagle, which has traditionally been symbolic for the freedom represented by America.
  9. 9. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," Latin for "out of many, one," is inscribed on the reverse just to the left of the eagle's breast.
  10. 10. The mint mark location is just to the left of the arrow tips. On the pictured coin there is an "S" mint mark which indicates this coin was minted at San Francisco.
  11. 11. The eagle sits atop a bundle of arrows around which is wrapped an olive branch. Together, these two symbolize America's military strength and readiness to defend its interests and its desire for peace.
  12. 12. The legal tender denomination of "FIVE DOLLARS" is inscribed along the bottom rim of the coin's reverse.

FACT:

On April 2, 1792, a bill passed the U.S. Congress that established that the unit for the $5 legal tender coin denomination be described as a "half eagle."

$10 INDIAN HEAD EAGLE

Minted From: 1907-1920, 1926, 1930, 1932 & 1933 Diameter: 27 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: Augustus Saint-Gaudens Net Weight: .48375 oz pure gold
Weight: 16.718 grams Edge: 46 raised stars (1907-1911) and 48 raised stars (1912-1933) representing the states in the Union.
  1. 1. Inscribed around the rim of the obverse are THIRTEEN STARS denoting the original 13 colonies of the United States.
  2. 2. The head of the Indian figure is crowned with an Indian War Bonnet held together by a band, which carries the inscription "LIBERTY".
  3. 3. Saint-Gaudens used a classical Liberty profile rather than an authentic Indian for his main obverse device.
  4. 4. The mint year date is inscribed along the obverse rim at the bottom center.
  5. 5. "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" is inscribed around the top rim of the coin's reverse denoting the coin as US legal tender.
  6. 6. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "out of many, one," is inscribed on the reverse just above the eagle's back.
  7. 7. The central device on the reverse is a majestic eagle, which has traditionally been symbolic for the freedom represented by America.
  8. 8. The motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" is inscribed near the left rim of the reverse just to the left of the eagle's breast.
  9. 9. The mint mark location is just to the left of the arrow tips. On the pictured coin, there is a "D" mint mark, which indicates this coin was minted at Denver.
  10. 10. The eagle sits atop a bundle of arrows around which is wrapped in an olive branch. Together, these two symbolize America's military strength and readiness to defend its interests and its desire for peace.
  11. 11. The legal tender denomination of "TEN DOLLARS" is inscribed along the bottom rim of the coin's reverse.

FACT:

On April 2, 1792, a bill passed the U.S. Congress that established that the unit for the $10 legal tender coin denomination be described as an "eagle."

TYPE II $20 LIBERTY DOUBLE EAGLE

Minted From: 1866-1876 Diameter: 34 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, Carson City and San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: James B. Longacre .96750 ounces pure gold
Weight: 33.436 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. U.S. Mint Chief Engraver, James B. Longacre's design employed thirteen stars as an obverse device to acknowledge the original thirteen colonies.
  2. 2. On Liberty Double Eagles, Miss Liberty wears a coronet (small crown), featuring the word "LIBERTY" in raised-relief, which gave rise to the coins sometimes being called 'Coronet" gold pieces.
  3. 3. Longacre designed a rendition of Lady Liberty that adorns the obverse as the main device on the entire Liberty Double Eagle series.
  4. 4. In the Liberty Double Eagle design, the mint date for a particular coin is located at the bottom center of the obverse.
  5. 5. The "beading" that adorns the inner rim of the obverse and reverse was a decorative feature popularly used on many 19th century coins in America and around the world. It's use fell out of favor in the 20th century.
  6. 6. The national designation of 'UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" appears in raised-relief around the upper rim and sides of the reverse design.
  7. 7. Beginning in 1866, for the first time ever in U.S. $20 gold coin designs, the motto "IN GOD WE TRUST," which is located near the top center of the reverse, is used.
  8. 8.The main "reverse" device of Liberty Double Eagles is an eagle with a heraldic shield. In his left talon, he holds a fasces of bundled arrows symbolizing America's military preparedness, while in his right he holds an olive branch symbolizing the U.S. desire for peace.
  9. 9. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "out of many, one," denotes the joining of many states into a single union, and appears in the decorative scrolls on both sides of the eagle.
  10. 10. On Liberty Double Eagle designs, the mint mark denoting which U.S. Mint branch produced the coin is located at the bottom center of the reverse just below the eagle.
  11. 11. From 1866-1876, the legal tender denomination of "TWENTY D" appears in raised-relief along the bottom rim of the reverse.

FACT:

On April 2, 1792, a bill passed the U.S. Congress, which established that the unit for the $10 legal tender coin denomination be described as an "eagle." The "double eagle" denomination is $20 and contains double the gold content of an 'eagle."
While the eagle appears on the reverse of most U.S. gold coins, the lion's share of obverse designs feature a variety of portraits of female figures personifying the concept of 'liberty," which many view as the cornerstone of American democracy. [2]

TYPE III $20 LIBERTY DOUBLE EAGLE

Minted From: 1877-1907 Diameter: 34 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, Carson City, Denver, New Orleans & San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: James B. Longacre Net Weight: .96750 ounces pure gold
Weight: 33.436 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. U.S. Mint Chief Engraver, James B. Longacre's design employed thirteen stars as an obverse device to acknowledge the original thirteen colonies.
  2. 2. On Liberty Double Eagles, Miss Liberty wears a coronet (small crown), featuring the word "LIBERTY" in raised-relief, which gave rise to the coins sometimes being called "Coronet" gold pieces.
  3. 3. Longacre designed a rendition of Lady Liberty that adorns the obverse as the main device on the entire Liberty Double Eagle series.
  4. 4. In the Liberty Double Eagle design, the mint date for a particular coin is located at the bottom center of the obverse.
  5. 5. The "beading" that adorns the inner rim of the obverse and reverse was a decorative feature popularly used on many 19th century coins in America and around the world. It's use fell out of favor in the 20th century.
  6. 6. The national designation of "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" appears in raised-relief around the upper rim and sides of the reverse design.
  7. 7. Beginning in 1866, for the first time ever in U.S. $20 gold coin designs, the motto "IN GOD WE TRUST," which is located near the top center of the reverse, is used.
  8. 8. The main "reverse" device of Liberty Double Eagles is an eagle with a heraldic shield. In his left talon, he holds a fasces of bundled arrows symbolizing America's military preparedness, while in his right he holds an olive branch symbolizing the U.S. desire for peace.
  9. 9. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "out of many, one," denotes the joining of many states into a single union, and appears in the decorative scrolls on both sides of the eagle.
  10. 10. On Liberty Double Eagle designs, the mint mark denoting which U.S. Mint branch produced the coin is located at the bottom center of the reverse just below the eagle.
  11. 11. From 1877-1907, the legal tender denomination of "TWENTY DOLLARS" appears in raised-relief along the bottom rim of the reverse.

FACT:

On April 2, 1792, a bill passed the U.S. Congress, which established that the unit for the $10 legal tender coin denomination be described as an "eagle." The "double eagle" denomination is $20 and contains double the gold content of an "eagle."
At times, portraits of Miss Liberty have been based on actual women who served as models. However, they are meant to be allegorical in representing the concept of "liberty," rather than a particular individual. [3]

1915-S PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION QUARTER EAGLE

Minted From: 1915 Diameter: 18 mm
Minted At: San Francisco Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: Charles E. Barber & George T. Morgan Net Weight: .12094 ounces pure gold
Total Weight: 4.18 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. The commemorative designation of "Panama-Pacific Exposition" appears in raised-relief around the upper rim and sides of the obverse design.
  2. 2. The main obverse device is an image of the sea-goddess Columbia seated on a hippocampus and holding a caduceus in her left hand.
  3. 3. The caduceus, which is widely recognized as the symbol of the medical profession, symbolizes the role doctors played in the malaria outbreaks during the Panama Canal's construction and memorializes the many lives lost on the project.
  4. 4. The hippocampus, which is a mythical sea horse creature featuring the fore legs of a horse and a body that ends in a dolphin or fish, symbolizes the potential seafaring uses of the Panama Canal.
  5. 5. The "S" mint mark designation denoting the coin's production at the San Francisco Mint is located near the bottom of the coin's obverse to the right of the mint date.
  6. 6. The sole mint date of 1915 appears at the bottom center of the obverse.
  7. 7. The national designation of "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" appears in raised-relief around the upper rim and sides of the reverse design.
  8. 8. The main reverse device depicts an eagle with raised wings poised to take flight.
  9. 9. The eagle stands atop a mantle upon which is inscribed the motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which means "out of many, one."
  10. 10. At the bottom rim of the reverse appears the legal tender denomination of "2 1/2 DOL."

FACT:

The 1915-S Panama-Pacific Exposition was the first gold commemorative Quarter Eagle ever minted. The original mintage released by the U.S. Mint was a scant total of only 6,749 coins. [4]

1926 SESQUICENTENNIAL OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE QUARTER EAGLE

Minted From: 1926 Diameter: 18 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia Composition: .900 gold & .100 copper
Designer: John R. Sinnock Net Weight: .12094 ounces pure gold
Weight: 4.18 grams Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. The commemorative designation of "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" is in raised-relief around the upper rim and sides of the obverse design.
  2. 2. The main obverse device features Mint Engraver John Sinnock's rendition of a standing female figure symbolizing Liberty.
  3. 3. In Liberty's right hand, she holds the Torch of Freedom.
  4. 4. In Liberty's left hand is a scroll symbolizing the Declaration of Independence.
  5. 5. Near the far right of the coin's obverse is the mint year date of "1926," which is the sesquicentennial date of America's independence from England.
  6. 6. In the lower left of the obverse, the date "1776" is in raised-relief denoting the year America declared its independence from England.
  7. 7. Along the bottom rim of the coin's obverse, the word "LIBERTY" appears in raised-relief.
  8. 8. Along the sides and upper rim of the reverse, "SESQUICENTENNIAL OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE" appears in raised-relief, which commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.
  9. 9. Near the top center of the coin, the motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" appears, where the bell tower of Independence Hall splits the motto into two parts.
  10. 10. The main reverse device depicts Independence Hall in Philadelphia where the Declaration of Independence was signed.
  11. 11. Just below the base of Independence Hall appears the motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which means "out of many, one."
  12. 12. At the bottom rim of the reverse appears the legal tender denomination of "2 1/2 DOLLARS."

FACT:

It is one of only two Gold Commemorative Quarter Eagles ever minted. The original mintage was only 46,019 total coins. Well preserved specimens comprise the minority portion of the original mintage. [5]

$25 GOLD AMERICAN EAGLE

Minted From: 1986-Present* Diameter: 27 mm*
Minted At: Philadelphia and West Point Composition: .9167 gold, .03 silver & .0533 copper
Obverse Designer: Augustus Saint-Gaudens Reverse Designer: Miley (MB) Frost
Net Weight: .50 ounces pure gold* Total Weight: 16.966 grams*
Edge: Reeded to prevent gold shaving by unscrupulous individuals

* The above specifications are for the 1/2 ounce $25 Gold Eagle.

  1. 1. The original Augustus Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle obverse design from 1907 employed the "one state, one star" approach and used 46 stars to denote the 46 states then in the union. In 1986, designers updated the Gold American Eagle obverse design using 50 stars.
  2. 2. Just beneath the stars at the top center of the obverse, the word "LIBERTY," which is used as a motto on most U.S. coins, appears in raised-relief.
  3. 3. In Miss Liberty's right hand is the Torch of Freedom.
  4. 4. In Miss Liberty's left hand is an olive branch traditionally denoting the U.S. desire for peace.
  5. 5. The main obverse device is a full screen depiction of Saint-Gaudens' Miss Liberty striding majestically toward the viewer with the rays of the sun and the U.S. Congress dome appearing in the background.
  6. 6. The mint date for the Gold Eagles appears near the lower right side of the obverse in raised-relief on top of the sun rays in the background.*
  7. 7. Directly below the mint date, the initials "ASG" appear in a stacked design format to honor and acknowledge designer Augustus Saint-Gaudens.
  8. 8. The "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" designation appears in raised-relief along the upper reverse rim.
  9. 9. The main reverse device features a family of eagles. The father eagle holds an olive branch in his talons and hovers above the nest with the mother and her hatchlings.
  10. 10. The motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" appears about midway down on the right side of the obverse.
  11. 11. The motto "E PLURIBUS UNUM," which is Latin for "out of many, one," denotes the joining of many states into a single union, and appears about midway down on the left side of the reverse.
  12. 12. Along the Gold Eagle's reverse bottom rim, raised-relief inscriptions denoting the gold weight and legal tender denomination appear.
  13. 13. The initials of reverse designer Miley (MB) Frost and engraver Sherl J. Winter appear beneath the eagle's nest.
  14. 14. Miley Frost's reverse design was the first to depict multiple eagles on a United States coin. The spirit behind her design was to honor the family and America. She liked to think of America as a caring family.

FACT:

The Roman numeral date design was used only from 1986-1991.

SILVER AMERICAN EAGLE

Minted In: 1986-Present Diameter: 40.6 mm
Minted At: Philadelphia, San Francisco & West Point Composition: .9993 silver & .0007 copper
Obverse Designer: Adolph A. Weinman Net Weight: 1.0 ounce fine silver
Reverse Designer: John M. Mercanti Total Weight: 31.101 grams
Edge: Reeded to prevent silver shaving by unscrupulous individuals
  1. 1. The obverse of the Silver Eagles is based on Adolph A. Weinman's classic "Walking Liberty" half dollar design, which has the motto "LIBERTY" appearing in raised-relief spaced around the top half of the obverse's rim.
  2. 2. The main obverse device of Weinman's classic "Walking Liberty" design, features a depiction of Miss Liberty walking to her right, with her right arm outstretched with open hand, while holding olive branches in the crook of her left arm. A sun appears in the background near the lower left rim.
  3. 3. The motto "IN GOD WE TRUST" also appears on the obverse's lower right side just below the "Y" in the LIBERTY motto
  4. 4. Adolph A. Weinman's initials, which originally appeared on the reverse of the "Walking Liberty" half dollar design, appear in the hem of Miss Liberty's gown on the obverse.
  5. 5. The mint date for the Silver Eagles appears at the bottom center rim of the obverse.
  6. 6. John Mercanti's reverse design for the Silver Eagles places the national designation "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA" around the upper rim of the reverse design in raised-relief.
  7. 7. Near the top center of the reverse, Mercanti placed thirteen stars in an upside down triangle just above the eagle's head, acknowledging the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States.
  8. 8. For the main reverse device, Mercanti designed a heraldic eagle with shield in the classic tradition, holding a fasces of arrows in his left talon symbolizing America's military preparedness, while in his right he holds an olive branch denoting the U.S. desire for peace.
  9. 9. Adorning the bottom half of the reverse's rim are raised-relief inscriptions denoting the silver weight as "1 OZ. FINE SILVER" and the legal tender denomination as "ONE DOLLAR."
  10. 10. The initials of reverse designer John Mercanti appear to the right of the eagle's tail feathers.

FACT:

Silver Eagle Bullion coins have no mint mark. However, on proof specimens, it would appear on the lower left reverse, just above the letter "E" in the word "FINE."
Since they first appeared in 1986, the Silver American Eagles have become the world's best-selling silver bullion coins.


Coins Related to Coin Symbology:

Sort By:  
2009 Ultra High Relief Gold Double Eagle MS 70 (70)
  • The U.S. Mint recreated Saint Gaudens’ magnificent double eagle as originally conceived
  • Inspired by visionary leader President Theodore Roosevelt
  • NGC Certified
  • Thickness of 4 millimeters – twice as thick as any other U.S.  1-ounce gold coin
  • Contains 1 full ounce of 24-karat gold (.9999 fine)
  • Great luster, beauty and razor-sharp detail
  • Very popular and prices have trended higher
  • Hand-Selected by Award-Winning Expert Mike Fuljenz
  • Coin pictures for representation only
Add to Cart
$2,700.00
U.S. GOLD $20 ST. GAUDENS NGC-62 NO MOTTO (BU)
U.S. GOLD
$20 ST. GAUDENS NGC-62 NO MOTTO
.900 FINE GOLD
0.96750 oz
$1,380.00
U.S. GOLD $20 ST. GAUDENS NGC-63 NO MOTTO (BU)
U.S. GOLD
$20 ST. GAUDENS NGC-63 NO MOTTO
.900 FINE GOLD
0.96750 oz
$1,425.00
Per Page      1 - 3 of 3
Live Help
X



Our Expert